International Symposium on Multigenerational Data Linkage

International Symposium on Multigenerational Data Linkage

                    

International Symposium on Multigenerational Data Linkage: The Challenges and Opportunities of Family-Based Research 

22 September 2021 - Australian/New Zealand time / 21 September 2021 - Canadian time

The PHRN and IPDLN are excited host this International Symposium on Multigenerational Data Linkage: The Challenges and Opportunities of Family-Based Research. Bringing together expert data linkage knowledge from Australia, Canada and New Zealand to cover topics including: 

  • What are multigenerational linked data and how can we use these data?
  • How to link multigenerational data
  • Analysing multigenerational linked data
  • Ethics, data governance and policy implications of multigenerational linked data

This two hour online symposium promises to be an exciting, participative and informative event for all those involved with any aspect of data linkage and linked data.

Click here to view symposium program

Recording now available

Presenters

Dr. Lisa Lix is Professor of Biostatistics and a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Methods for Electronic Health Data Quality in the Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Canada. She is also Director of the Data Science Platform in the George & Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, which is a collaboration between the Winnipeg health region and the University of Manitoba. Dr. Lix’s research focuses on methods for conducting population health and health policy research using electronic health databases. Her contributions lie in four main areas: (1) statistical methods to evaluate the quality of electronic health databases for research and disease surveillance, (2) risk prediction modeling, (3) statistical methods for patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), and (4) post-marketing surveillance of prescription drug safety and effectiveness. Dr. Lix’s research aims to develop and apply statistical models to address the challenges of less-than-optimal quality of healthcare databases. She collaborates widely on studies about population health and health service use. Her current research uses the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy Population Research Data Repository to develop methods for multigenerational studies and use family health histories in chronic disease risk prediction models.

Dr. Amani Hamad is a postdoctoral fellow at the George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation in the Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Canada. She completed her PhD in 2019 at the University of Manitoba in the College of Pharmacy in the area of pharmacoepidemiology using administrative databases.

Dr. Hamad has expertise in pharmacoepidemiology, maternal and child health, multigenerational health research, and administrative database studies. Her current research focuses on constructing population-based family health histories across multiple generations using administrative healthcare databases and use these histories to predict the risk of chronic physical and mental health conditions.

Barry Milne is Director of the Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS)at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. His main interests are in lifecourse research, intergenerational research, surveys, and the use of administrative data to answer policy and research questions.

Andrew Sporle is a Māori researcher and data sovereignty advocate with over twenty-five years’ experience developing initiatives in social and health research as well as indigenous research workforce development across the public, private and academic sectors. His current work involves initiating permanent structural changes to data infrastructure and practice with the aim of increasing the impact and accessibility of data resources in New Zealand, Australia and Pacific countries.  He is also based part-time in the Statistics Department at the University of Auckland, where he teaches in courses on survey methods, official statistics, data ethics, statistical consulting and statistical literacy.

 

Ms Bhaval Chandaria, Data Information Systems, Information and System Performance Directorate, Department of Health, Western Australia.  

Bhaval Chandaria is Team Leader Data Linkage at the Department of Health, Western Australia. Bhaval has worked in data linkage for over 8 years, and is passionate about improving and expanding linkage services in order to continue to provide high quality data for research, policy development, and service planning and evaluation within Western Australia.